Lonsdale Avenue Commercial Building / Hemsworth Architecture

Lonsdale Avenue Commercial Building / Hemsworth Architecture

© Ema Pierre© Ema PierreLonsdale Avenue Commercial Building / Hemsworth Architecture© Ema Pierre+ 17


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    7600 sq. Ft.

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2021


  • Photographs Photographs: Ema Peter, KK Law

  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Vectorworks, Atlas Schindler, Cooler, Interstate brick, Kohler, SIGA, Soprema, Structurlam, The BILCO company, British Columbia Passive House, Broda, Cascadia Clip, Urban Solutions DeepRoot, Optiwin, Rockwool, Stego Industries, Trimble Navigation





© Ema Pierre
© Ema Pierre

Text description provided by the architects. The property at 1 Lonsdale has been in a local family for three generations. When the existing building was nearing the end of its lifespan, the family chose to use this opportunity to develop a new three-story passive building that would serve as a sustainable benchmark for the rapidly evolving Lower Lonsdale district.

© Ema Pierre
© Ema Pierre
Plan - First floor
Plan – First floor

The intention of the design was to create a contemporary interpretation of the brick and hardwood clad warehouse buildings that formed the backbone of the working waterfront. Along with the project’s enduring ambitions, the new building presents the district of Lower Lonsdale with the familiarity and ‘down to earth’ feeling of a dark glazed brick building that reads like a ‘skin’ for the solid timber framing, for example. opposition to a traditional building “massive” building. The windows on the two upper floors of the building have been distributed “at random” to provide visual interest and relief from the predictable facades typical of commercial buildings. Special attention was given to the corner of Lonsdale Avenue and Carrie Cates Court by eroding the brick facade of the upper floors to express the solid wood structure through a PH curtain wall system while providing occupants from the upper floors a breathtaking view of Vancouver Harbor.

Bracing elevation
Bracing elevation
© Ema Pierre
© Ema Pierre

On the urban level, the building supports the development of the street wall with the Polygon gallery, while creating a comfortable ladder and a street level accessible to pedestrians. The ground floor of the building was designed to ‘open up’ to Carrie Cates by incorporating floor to ceiling, PH triple glazed windows and sliding doors. With the opening of the new Polygon Gallery and the activation of Carrie Cates, the new restaurant will offer a south-facing outdoor patio and a row of “wrap” restaurants on Carrie Cates. The result will be the further development of the Arts and Culture District of Lower Lonsdale.

© Ema Pierre
© Ema Pierre

That said, the most notable aspect of the project is the innovation in prefabrication and solid wood construction methodologies. The project faced a number of building code challenges, including the use of a CLT and glue-laminated timber structure and the need for a non-combustible party wall on the lot zero line. Considering the complexity of the PH airtightness and the limited thermal bridging requirements, a pre-fabricated 2×8 insulated vertical wall panel system was used for all three “visible” sides of the building. A series of CLT panels with the membrane, exterior insulation and sheathing pre-installed were then used to create the north wall while providing the necessary fire resistance.

Construction sequence
Construction sequence
Courtesy of Naturally: Wood.  Image © KK Law
Courtesy of Naturally: Wood. Image © KK Law

Simply put, the main mass timber structure was erected and then the PH outer shell was covered, all in just 10 days of construction. This extraordinary achievement was accomplished through the deep integration of the design and engineering team, with the general contractor, prefab and solid wood suppliers, window manufacturers and local authorities. Faced with the obvious challenges of the climate crisis, we are convinced that this type of innovative approach to construction will become a necessity in the very near future.




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