Construction Management – Able Property Inspections http://ablepropertyinspections.com/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 16:11:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Construction Management – Able Property Inspections http://ablepropertyinspections.com/ 32 32 Boston asks developers to disclose their participation in WMBE http://ablepropertyinspections.com/boston-asks-developers-to-disclose-their-participation-in-wmbe/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 16:11:31 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/boston-asks-developers-to-disclose-their-participation-in-wmbe/ Boston City Hall Developers of proposed major projects in Boston will be asked to disclose their plans to ensure project teams are diverse, Mayor Michelle Wu announced Thursday morning. The policy will apply to all projects 20,000 square feet or more, Boston Planning and Development Agency Director Arthur Jemison told reporters at a news conference […]]]>

Boston City Hall

Developers of proposed major projects in Boston will be asked to disclose their plans to ensure project teams are diverse, Mayor Michelle Wu announced Thursday morning.

The policy will apply to all projects 20,000 square feet or more, Boston Planning and Development Agency Director Arthur Jemison told reporters at a news conference at the Boston Hotel. town. BPDA’s board is expected to vote on the measure at tonight’s meeting.

“Boston is a growing city and we want that to continue,” Wu said. world to truly create a common wealth.”

Developers will be asked to list certified women and minority-owned businesses involved in the project and what role they play in all phases of development, including its ongoing operation, when filing a project notification form. , Planned Development Area Application or Institutional Master Plan Notification Form. Developers will also be asked to list strategies they will follow to drive supplier diversity – including goals they have set themselves – strategies for building other companies’ capabilities, workforce training programs work, the composition of the development team and any information on the diversity of the development team, equity and inclusion goals that “help provide a more comprehensive understanding of the impacts of economic development”.

The city does not have the legal authority to compel developers to include women and minority-owned businesses on its project teams, unlike the sale or lease of city-owned land for development, so the policy will only be a request for now, Jemison said, and will not take into account the BPDA’s decision to support or oppose a proposed project.

However, noted Boston Housing Chief Sheila Dillon, the new policy has the power to spark important conversations in the real estate industry.

“When you ask for information…it’s not a requirement, but it does make people stop and think about what we’re trying to do together,” she said.

The relative lack of diversity among real estate developers working in Boston has long been a topic of concern and conversation, both among city leaders and in the real estate industry. Even prominent black industry leaders like Greg Janey, president and CEO of Janey Construction Management, noted that they faced a “concrete ceiling” when trying to find new opportunities. Some real estate and construction companies and trade groups have invested resources in initiatives such as internship programs and talent pools, but significant barriers remain.

The city’s economic inclusion chief, Segun Idowu, said many local businesses and residents were still being left behind.

“There’s an awful lot of talent in our communities that we’re leaving on the table,” he said. “It’s also an opportunity for our friends in the development community to show off the work they’ve done.”

Idowu said the city “stands here ready” to help the development community increase the participation of women and minority-owned businesses and workers in its projects.

Jemison and Idowu said the city does not currently have any type of clearinghouse in place to connect interested developers with women- and minority-owned businesses, but said something like this could eventually be put in place. Idowu also noted that private groups like the Builders of Color Coalition and Foundation for Business Equity or Maven Construction’s Surge Contractor Incubator could help foster those connections.

Jemison added that developers should be sure to highlight one of their own female and minority employees who could work on a project.

Ultimately, Jemison said, politics is important in ensuring that city residents see their own economic success in every new development in Boston.

“I want everyone to look at the buildings going up and see them improve the city,” he said.

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Navajo presidential hopefuls select NM running mates | Kingman Miner Daily http://ablepropertyinspections.com/navajo-presidential-hopefuls-select-nm-running-mates-kingman-miner-daily/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 17:57:43 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/navajo-presidential-hopefuls-select-nm-running-mates-kingman-miner-daily/ FLAGSTAFF — Two men vying for the presidency of the Navajo Nation announced their running mates on Monday, choosing candidates from the New Mexico portion of the reservation to broaden their appeal. Navajo President Jonathan Nez chose Chad Abeyta, a 33-year-old political newcomer who is an Air Force veteran and works as a lawyer in […]]]>

FLAGSTAFF — Two men vying for the presidency of the Navajo Nation announced their running mates on Monday, choosing candidates from the New Mexico portion of the reservation to broaden their appeal.

Navajo President Jonathan Nez chose Chad Abeyta, a 33-year-old political newcomer who is an Air Force veteran and works as a lawyer in the tribe’s legislative branch. Nez said Abeyta had strong family values ​​and a boot mentality, and pointed out that Abeyta returned to the reserve after finishing college.

“I am honored to join this team,” said Abeyta. “I bring to the table leadership skills, critical thinking, and plan to use creative solutions to solve many of these problems.”

Buu Nygren chose Richelle Montoya, the 45-year-old elected leader of the Torreon/Star Lake chapter and school board member whose husband is an Army veteran. Nygren cast Montoya as a wife and mother who will challenge the status quo and ensure the voices of ordinary Navajos are heard.

“I feel so humbled to be in the position I’m in, and I really hope it brings more young women into leadership roles in our community and government,” Montoya said.

No women have been elected president or vice president of the Navajo Nation, which has by far the largest landmass of any Native American tribe in the United States and is the second most populous. The 27,000 square mile reservation spans New Mexico, Arizona and Utah.

Nygren isn’t the first to choose a woman as her running mate. Former Navajo presidential candidate Chris Deschene selected Fannie Atcitty in 2014, but Deschene was disqualified from the race due to a language proficiency requirement that was later changed.

Nez and Nygren will face each other in the November general election. They were the top two voters among 15 presidential candidates, including seven women, in last week’s primary elections. The results are not official until they are certified by the tribe’s election committee, which is expected to meet in the coming days.

Nez and Nygren announced their running mates in the nonpartisan race past the sandstone structure that gives the tribal capital of Window Rock in Arizona its name.

Selecting a running mate from another region of the reserve is a strategic decision to balance a presidential ticket. Abeyta is from Alamo and Montoya is from Torreon – two communities on the New Mexico side of the reservation.

Nygren, who has a background in construction management, grew up near the Arizona-Utah border in the Navajo Nation. He was running for vice president in 2018.

Nez, who served as a tribal legislator and vice president of the tribe before being elected to his first term as president, is from Shonto, Arizona.

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Plans to build an underground hydrogen storage plant in Utah http://ablepropertyinspections.com/plans-to-build-an-underground-hydrogen-storage-plant-in-utah/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 01:56:07 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/plans-to-build-an-underground-hydrogen-storage-plant-in-utah/ A 300 GWh underground hydrogen storage plant in Utah, USA is about to start construction. The project is being developed by Mitsubishi Power Americas and Magnum Development. Recently, the Office of Loan Programs of the Department of Energy (DOE) provided a loan guarantee of US$504.4 million for the development of the project. Advanced Clean Energy […]]]>

A 300 GWh underground hydrogen storage plant in Utah, USA is about to start construction. The project is being developed by Mitsubishi Power Americas and Magnum Development. Recently, the Office of Loan Programs of the Department of Energy (DOE) provided a loan guarantee of US$504.4 million for the development of the project. Advanced Clean Energy Storage I, LLC is the beneficiary of the loan.

The underground hydrogen storage plant in Utah will include two caverns with a capacity of 150 GWh to store hydrogen in two huge salt caverns. The hydrogen will be produced by the Intermountain Power Agency’s renewed IPP project. The latter is an 840 MW gas turbine combined cycle power plant nearby.

The plant will initially run on a mix of 30% green hydrogen and 70% natural gas starting in 2025. That’s according to a statement from Aces Delta. Additionally, the release notes that the facility will slowly expand to 100% green hydrogen by 2045.

The underground hydrogen storage plant in Utah will be built under an engineering, procurement and construction management (EPCM) contract. The contract was awarded to the American contractor WSP USA. The latter is a Canadian company providing management and consulting services in the built and natural environment.

The stored green hydrogen turns into an energy reserve that can be released at any time to fuel power generation. The underground hydrogen storage plant in Utah, in addition to the storage caverns, constitutes the Advanced Clean Energy Storage hub. The plant will use 220 MW of electrolysers to convert renewable energy into up to 100 metric tons of green hydrogen each day.

Development of the project began in May 2019.

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Jonathan Nez, Buu Nygren Advance for Navajo Presidency http://ablepropertyinspections.com/jonathan-nez-buu-nygren-advance-for-navajo-presidency/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:16:00 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/jonathan-nez-buu-nygren-advance-for-navajo-presidency/ By FELICIA FONSECA, Associated Press FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Navajo Nation voters will see some familiar faces in the tribe’s general election: their current president and a former running mate, both of whom were on the ballot in 2018. President Jonathan Nez and Buu Nygren garnered the most votes in Tuesday’s primary from a field […]]]>

By FELICIA FONSECA, Associated Press

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Navajo Nation voters will see some familiar faces in the tribe’s general election: their current president and a former running mate, both of whom were on the ballot in 2018.

President Jonathan Nez and Buu Nygren garnered the most votes in Tuesday’s primary from a field of 15. The winner will oversee the largest Native American reservation in the United States and the second-highest tribal population.

Both spoke of the need for economic development and the extension of running water and electricity to the thousands of Navajo who lack it. Where they differ is on the approach to getting through the coronavirus pandemic.

The Navajo Nation once had one of the highest infection rates in the United States. Nez’s administration has taken tough measures to slow the spread. Cinemas, restaurants, casinos and gyms are still not yet fully open, and a mask mandate remains.

political cartoons

Nez, a seasoned politician, championed the approach of keeping people safe. He said he would bring continuity into a second term, as the tribe strives to spend more than $1 billion in federal virus relief funding that would largely be for infrastructure.

“I think the Navajo people have seen that we are capable of handling a difficult situation, Nez, 47, told The Associated Press. “Not just coming from management, but rallying the Navajo people to take care of our people, and they’ve done an amazing job.”

Nygren was former President Joe Shirley Jr.’s running mate in 2018. The two lost to Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer.

Nygren quit his job in construction management to seek the tribe’s top job and says Navajo businesses are suffering because of pandemic restrictions. He said the Navajo Nation has not been quick enough to respond to a huge loss of revenue from closed coal mines and coal-fired power plants and should capitalize on tourism. He has positioned himself as a diplomat who will bring a modern perspective to the presidency.

“It’s very clear that new leadership is being sought throughout the Navajo Nation,” the 35-year-old told The Associated Press. “Just the number of people who came out to vote in a Navajo election where flooding was happening, the roads were terrible.”

Nearly 48,000 Navajo voted in the tribe’s primary elections, a turnout of nearly 39 percent among more than 123,000 registered voters, according to unofficial results from the tribe’s election office. The tribe typically sees a turnout of around 50%. The results still need to be certified.

Nez garnered 17,073 votes in the primary election and Nygren won 12,878 votes with the 110 reported precincts, according to unofficial results. They will choose their own running mates for the general election in the non-partisan race.

Rounding out the top five are attorney Justin Jones, former Navajo attorney general Ethel Branch and Diné College Board of Regents chairman Greg Bigman, who collectively received nearly 14,000 votes.

Navajo voters also narrowed the slate of candidates for seats on the 24-member Navajo Nation Council, ousting fewer than a handful of incumbents. The current Chairman of the Council, Seth Damon, is the only one to have presented himself without opposition.

The reservation is larger than 10 US states, covering 27,000 square miles (69,930 square kilometers) of high desert, forests, windswept mesas and mountains bordering New Mexico, Arizona and Utah . Its population of 406,000 is second only to the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

The slate of candidates agreed that more jobs were needed on the reservation where unemployment hovers around 50%. The candidates pushed platforms that included finding ways to preserve the Navajo language and pressuring the federal government to fulfill its duty to provide public safety, health and education.

Supporters of the candidates set up tents across the Navajo Nation on Tuesday, offering fried bread and other food to voters as they made a last ditch campaign effort. Election Day is a social event in the Navajo Nation, although some precautions were still in place due to the coronavirus pandemic. This included closing to the public the athletic center in the tribal capital of Window Rock where election results are tallied.

The other candidates were educator Dolly Mason; academic Leslie Tsosie; Chinle Chapter President Rosanna Jumbo-Fitch; Frankie Davis; former New Mexico State Legislator Sandra Jeff; Emily Ellison; former Navajo Vice President Frank Dayish; Earl Sombrero, director of the Ts’ah Bii Kin chapter; and Dineh Benally and Kevin Cody, who both sought the Tribal Presidency in 2018.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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City Completes Drinking Water Upgrade for City Island Residents http://ablepropertyinspections.com/city-completes-drinking-water-upgrade-for-city-island-residents/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 09:05:54 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/city-completes-drinking-water-upgrade-for-city-island-residents/ Two 20 inch water pipes were laid from the mainland at Pelham Bay below Eastchester Bay to City Island. Image credit: SDC. Two new water pipes were placed under Eastchester Bay. On July 20, 2022, New York Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Rohit T. Aggarwala and New York City Department of Design and Construction […]]]>

Two 20 inch water pipes were laid from the mainland at Pelham Bay below Eastchester Bay to City Island. Image credit: SDC.

Two new water pipes were placed under Eastchester Bay. On July 20, 2022, New York Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Rohit T. Aggarwala and New York City Department of Design and Construction (DDC) Commissioner, Thomas Foley, announced the completion of a $34 million project to improve City Island’s drinking water. , residents of the Bronx. The project began in 2019 and was largely completed in December 2021 with funding from the Environmental Protection Department and direction from the Design and Construction Department.

New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Rohit T. Aggarwala said, This $34 million infrastructure investment will ensure residents, businesses and visitors of City Island have a reliable supply of high quality drinking water for generations to come.

CityEarth contacted the Department of Design and Construction to ask if there were any circumstances or conditions that necessitated the $34 million City Island project. The Department of Design and Construction responded through Deputy Public Information Officer Shoshana Kahn: “The two new underwater waterlines have been installed to replace an underwater waterline. 100-year-old marine and an exposed water pipe on the City Island Bridge that needed to be protected from weather and any other external factors.

Two new water pipes have been placed under Eastchester Bay for City Island residents and businesses. An old 12-inch water main and a temporary 16-inch water main located on the City Island Bridge were replaced with two new 20-inch underwater water main. The main waterlines extend from an area inside the park area of ​​Pelham Bay to City Island.

Construction engineers used horizontal directional drilling technology to create two 2,000-foot underwater passages through which the two new waterlines were pulled. The process included: drilling a pilot hole from end to end, enlarging the hole to accommodate the two new water pipes, and stabilizing the newly constructed tunnel with steel plates. A receiving pit was dug on City Island to receive the new water lines for addition to City Island’s water distribution system.

During construction on City Island, a cofferdam was constructed to create a dry and safe working environment while a yellow turbidity barrier was placed to protect the Eastchester Bay environment from any debris from the area of work.

New York City Department of Design and Construction (DDC) Commissioner Thomas Foley said, “Building a tunnel under Eastchester Bay was a complicated project that will ensure a reliable water supply for the City. Island for decades to come. I commend DDC personnel for their diligence in weathering the pandemic and for their dedication to protecting the environment and ensuring that work does not disturb nearby environmentally sensitive areas.

Bronx Borough President Vanessa L. Gibson said, “Drinking water is a basic human right, and it’s in our city’s interest that all New Yorkers have safe, clean tap water that’s free of toxins.” contamination.

The bike path connecting City Island to Pelham Bay Park and the footpath connecting Catherine Scott Drive to the Pelham Bay Bike Path have been restored.

Council Member Marjorie Velázquez said, “Residents and businesses on City Island have a right to clean water and a well-managed water supply…I am pleased to see that the completed project not only provides water, but also a new pipeline and hydrants for both City Island and Pelham Bay Park, as well as restored footpaths and bike paths.

The project ultimately received a Diamond Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies of New York and was named “2021 Project of the Year” by the NY/NJ Chapter (CMAA) of the Construction Management Association of America for providing safe and reliable drinking water to the city. The 4,500 inhabitants of the island.

This $34 million project was designed by Dewberry, implemented by Northeast Remsco Construction, Inc. and received engineering from McMillen Jacobs Associates.

New York Mayor Eric Adams said, “New Yorkers are made of the ‘best things on Earth,’ and the water we drink does and should be part of that.”

For before CityEarth coverage on the City Island project, click here.

By: Malka Amar (Malka is an intern at CityLaw and a student at New York Law School, class of 2023.)

SDC: “City completes new drinking water connection to City Island” (July 20, 2022).

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Alameda County sued by anti-affirmative action group http://ablepropertyinspections.com/alameda-county-sued-by-anti-affirmative-action-group/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 13:30:54 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/alameda-county-sued-by-anti-affirmative-action-group/ Alameda County’s efforts to ensure that minority and women-owned businesses get a share of state construction contracts violate the US and California constitutions, according to a lawsuit filed against the county in court this week. Lawyers for a San Diego group called Californians for Equal Rights Foundation say the Alameda County Public Works Agency and […]]]>

Alameda County’s efforts to ensure that minority and women-owned businesses get a share of state construction contracts violate the US and California constitutions, according to a lawsuit filed against the county in court this week.

Lawyers for a San Diego group called Californians for Equal Rights Foundation say the Alameda County Public Works Agency and its General Services Agency both oversee similar programs that “force general contractors to discriminate against sub -contractors” if they do not belong to a minority.

“The government should not pick winners and losers based on race or color,” Chunhua Liao said in a statement. Liao, an Alameda County resident and activist, is a plaintiff in the case.

The county programs — which push contractors working on many Alameda County projects to have at least 15% of the work done by minority-owned businesses and at least 5% by women-owned businesses — amount to “government-sanctioned racial discrimination”. according to the July 25 trial.

Wen Fa, an attorney with the Pacific Legal Foundation who filed the lawsuit, said the programs violate the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment to the US Constitution and California’s constitutional ban on racial preferences.

Although the county refers to the programs as “participation goals,” Fa said in an interview that they act more like minority allowances and introduce “racial quotas” into public procurement.

“If a prime contractor is unable to achieve these goals, then that prime contractor risks having their bid rejected, Fa said.

The county allows contractors to win a contract if they don’t meet the thresholds, but only if they can show they made “good faith efforts” to find minority contractors in the process, which, according to the Fa, can open the door to fraud.

He also said that missing the thresholds is a risky bet that general contractors generally don’t want to take.

“This will force the prime contractor to choose a sub-contractor not because of the qualifications of the sub-contractor to do the job, but simply because the sub-contractor is a minority-owned business and their participation will help the main contractor to achieve the goals,” said Fa.

He said this prevents contractors from being able to “compete fairly in public procurement”.

Fa said the purpose of the lawsuit is to push Alameda County to scrap participation goal programs altogether and implement a “transparent, fair, and open contracting process.”

Bisa Grant, CEO of Anchor, an Oakland construction management and engineering company that does business with Alameda County, said she thinks the turnout targets should be maintained.

“Thank goodness they exist,” she said in an interview Thursday.

Grant, a black woman, took over the company after working there for more than a decade in a management role. She said county programs help level the playing field that has long been skewed.

“Otherwise we would be like a youth football team starting from scratch versus a private college that has historically been well funded and has a great network and all the resources. We wouldn’t stand a chance, a leg to stand on,” she said.

“A lot of the time, organizations like this say, ‘It’s not fair because we have to turn people away,'” Grant said of longtime companies that have established networks of sub- contractors with whom they work.

“You deny us anyway – we are always denied. We have always been denied, there is simply no mandate to prevent this. So for me, thank goodness” for county programs, she said.

“It enlightens us a lot more and gives us the opportunity to build a business, a viable business where we can employ people. People who can support families. Because I have a leg to stand on when it comes to competing against people who have been in this industry for a long time,” she said.

The directors of the General Services Agency and the County Public Works Agency and the Alameda County Attorney’s Office did not respond to requests for comment regarding the lawsuit. Alameda County Board of Supervisors Chairman Keith Carson declined to comment due to ongoing litigation.

“I hope these policies comply with the law. If they’re not, we’ll have to make adjustments,” supervisor David Haubert said in an interview.

He said Alameda is a “majority-minority county” and that the percentages the county pushes for in public procurement strike him as “reasonable goals.”

“I stand by the intent, which is to help create jobs for people who reflect people in our community,” he said.

Fa said that in addition to Liao, an activist, the other plaintiff in the case is Deborah Ferrari, a trucking industry consultant. Both Liao and Ferrari are residents of Alameda County.

Californians for Equal Rights is a group that was formed in 2020 to oppose California’s Proposition 16, which would have overturned California’s affirmative action ban. Proposition 209, which was passed in 1996, prohibits affirmative action in public employment, public education, and public contracting.

“Proposition 16 was canceled in 2020, it’s a big win for us, but many public bodies are still trying to circumvent Proposition 209,” said Wenyuan Yu, executive director of the group, in an interview.

She said there was no “real empirical evidence” that women- and minority-owned businesses have been harmed or left behind in government procurement since Proposition 209 took effect.

“You can’t fight discrimination with more discrimination, and you can’t fight fire with fire,” she said.

Grant, the owner of the engineering company, said she appreciates Alameda County’s efforts to support minority and women-owned businesses, even if the policies aren’t perfect.

“I think any system is going to have its challenges, but instead of chasing it and getting rid of it, my experience says there are certain things that should be mandatory,” she said.

“I think the system needs to be strengthened, not weakened or dispelled,” she said.

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1st all-electric vehicle added to Prince William County fleet http://ablepropertyinspections.com/1st-all-electric-vehicle-added-to-prince-william-county-fleet/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 18:07:54 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/1st-all-electric-vehicle-added-to-prince-william-county-fleet/ The Prince William County Facilities and Fleet Management Department recently received its first new all-electric vehicle, or EV, with more to come. The county’s new Chevrolet Bolt joins the county’s 1,458-vehicle fleet that includes 24 hybrids as well as its gasoline-powered vehicles. “We’ve had hybrids in the fleet since 2008,” said Prince William County Facilities […]]]>

The Prince William County Facilities and Fleet Management Department recently received its first new all-electric vehicle, or EV, with more to come.

The county’s new Chevrolet Bolt joins the county’s 1,458-vehicle fleet that includes 24 hybrids as well as its gasoline-powered vehicles.

“We’ve had hybrids in the fleet since 2008,” said Prince William County Facilities and Fleet Management Assistant Manager Darrel Reynolds. “With the direction of the board to be carbon neutral by 2050, we need to start bringing in efficient vehicles now.”

The county is expected to have 80 all-electric, plug-in hybrid or hybrid vehicles in its fleet by 2024. The vehicles will meet user needs. “What we’re looking for is that vehicles should be replaced in the normal cycle, that there’s a viable electric or hybrid version for every department’s needs,” Reynolds said. “We’re not going to give them an electric vehicle to give them an electric vehicle and that we’re not just getting rid of vehicles just to introduce electrics and hybrids.”

All-electric and hybrid vehicles save on maintenance and fuel costs. “All the stats say there are 1,000 fewer moving parts in an electric vehicle, which means you’ll save money on maintenance and repairs,” said Brent Lineberger, director of customer service. of the Prince William County Facilities and Fleet Management Department. “For example, oil changes are a thing of the past with electric vehicles. Your brake wear is reduced because you’re using regenerative braking to slow the vehicle down, so that kinetic energy is fed back into the battery if you’re using a hybrid.

Fuel-efficient vehicles benefit the county and pay for themselves in the long run. “It’s going to make the county have less emissions coming out of the tailpipes. It’ll probably save more money because you’re not spending $5 a gallon at the pump for fuel. You’ll spend pennies on an electric charge, Lineberger said. “Most of your maintenance costs are going to be reduced, but we haven’t seen the statistics in Prince William County yet. We look at industry statistics.

The county recently installed 10 charging stations at the McCoart Government Center and will install more throughout the county as needed. “We are working with property management and facility construction management to put in place the necessary infrastructure to support additional vehicles. Our goal is to have the infrastructure in place before we get the electric vehicles,” Lineberger said.

Facilities and fleet management will also require support as the county adds new vehicles. “In addition to rolling out hybrids or electric vehicles, we want to make sure there is a supplier who can support us after the sale. Things fail and we need to have good parts distribution,” Lineberger said. “We will also need to train our technicians to ensure they work safely around these products and can support vehicles as we move in this direction.”

As manufacturers replace existing gasoline models with comparable EV and hybrid models, facilities and fleet management will be able to easily replace older vehicles. “It will not be something that we have to justify why we give them an electric vehicle. It should be the same thing they drive, just with a different power source,” Reynolds said.

The Chevy Bolt is rated at 275 miles on a charge, which will meet most county needs.

Submitted by the Prince William County Government.

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New Transfer Pathways to BTC Give Students a Powerful Option http://ablepropertyinspections.com/new-transfer-pathways-to-btc-give-students-a-powerful-option/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 00:01:47 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/new-transfer-pathways-to-btc-give-students-a-powerful-option/ JANESVILLE — Blackhawk Technical College will now offer two new degree programs that give students a powerful option: a streamlined, low-cost path to a bachelor’s degree. Made possible through a partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and UW-Whitewater in Rock County, Blackhawk’s new Associate of Arts and Associate of Science programs will allow students to […]]]>

JANESVILLE — Blackhawk Technical College will now offer two new degree programs that give students a powerful option: a streamlined, low-cost path to a bachelor’s degree. Made possible through a partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and UW-Whitewater in Rock County, Blackhawk’s new Associate of Arts and Associate of Science programs will allow students to build an academic foundation at Blackhawk, earning credits to put into any bachelor’s degree program at UW-Whitewater or any four-year university. “We are pleased to partner with UW-Whitewater and UW-Whitewater in Rock County, providing another opportunity for students seeking a bachelor’s degree,” said Dr. Tracy Pierner, president of Blackhawk Technical College. programs provide students with a wide range of studies that will provide a seamless transfer to a bachelor’s degree program, with an emphasis on general education as well. Students will complete general required courses at Blackhawk and UW-Whitewater in Rock County that emphasize the arts or sciences depending on their individual educational goals. UW-Whitewater at Rock County is thrilled to partner with Blackhawk Technical College.


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Lycopodium Named EPCM Contractor for Liontown’s Kathleen Valley Lithium Project http://ablepropertyinspections.com/lycopodium-named-epcm-contractor-for-liontowns-kathleen-valley-lithium-project/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 09:32:47 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/lycopodium-named-epcm-contractor-for-liontowns-kathleen-valley-lithium-project/ Posted by Daniel Gleeson on July 22, 2022 Lycopodium Minerals, a subsidiary of Lycopodium Limited, has been appointed to complete engineering, procurement and construction management (EPCM) and commissioning services for the delivery of the Kathleen Valley Lithium Project, Australia West, for Liontown Resources. The project is located at the western end of the […]]]>

Posted by Daniel Gleeson on July 22, 2022

Lycopodium Minerals, a subsidiary of Lycopodium Limited, has been appointed to complete engineering, procurement and construction management (EPCM) and commissioning services for the delivery of the Kathleen Valley Lithium Project, Australia West, for Liontown Resources.

The project is located at the western end of the Norseman-Wiluna greenstone belt, approximately 60 km north of Leinster and 680 km northeast of Perth. It is considered a Tier 1 battery metals asset with excellent grade and scale in one of the world’s leading mining districts.

After initially undertaking the Pre-Feasibility Study (PFS) update for the project, followed by Engineering Value Assessments, then Definitive Feasibility Study and Initial Engineering Design Services (FEED), Lycopodium now has the ability to manage the project throughout the EPCM delivery phase.

Kathleen Valley is one of the largest and richest hard rock lithium deposits in the world and, with an initial production capacity of 2.5 Mt/yr, is expected to provide approximately 500,000 t/y of concentrate. 6% lithium oxide. With first production scheduled for the June quarter of 2024, the deposit will also produce tantalum pentoxide.

Mining will primarily be underground, allowing direct access to higher-grade mineralization while minimizing waste and the project’s environmental footprint, with mined ore processed through a full flotation circuit.

Lycopodium will provide engineering design, equipment and material procurement, as well as construction management, pre-operational testing and commissioning services for processing facilities and associated non-processing infrastructure at Kathleen Valley , with the contract valued at approximately A$35 million ($24 million).

Lycopodium Limited Managing Director Peter De Leo said, “Kathleen Valley is a globally significant lithium project that will supply vital battery minerals to the burgeoning electric vehicle and energy storage industries. As we move toward a renewable energy future, the awarding of this project further solidifies our position as a premier partner in delivering lithium projects, and we thank Liontown for the opportunity to partner. to them on this important project.

Liontown says Kathleen Valley’s first production could occur in the June quarter of 2024.

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PDB Construction adds two members to its management team http://ablepropertyinspections.com/pdb-construction-adds-two-members-to-its-management-team/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 17:24:26 +0000 http://ablepropertyinspections.com/pdb-construction-adds-two-members-to-its-management-team/ BUFFALO GROVE — PDB Construction has made two additions to its management team. Michael Swain became vice president and Marty Mansch was promoted to general superintendent. Swain has 23 years of experience in construction management and commercial real estate development. During his career, he has completed over 2.2 million square feet of industrial and commercial […]]]>

BUFFALO GROVE — PDB Construction has made two additions to its management team. Michael Swain became vice president and Marty Mansch was promoted to general superintendent.

Swain has 23 years of experience in construction management and commercial real estate development. During his career, he has completed over 2.2 million square feet of industrial and commercial projects. He also has expertise in medical practices and retail construction.

Mansch is a construction industry veteran with over 30 years of experience. He joined PDB Construction in 2021 as Superintendent. Much of his career has been focused on “from scratch” commercial construction assignments.

In these new roles, Swain and Mansch will oversee the construction of commercial facilities with a strong focus on safety, quality and efficiency. PDB Construction currently manages projects for clients in Illinois, Ohio and Texas, and is rapidly expanding into other markets.

PDB Construction specializes in construction management.

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